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Jack London

1876–1916
Jack London photographed by Arnold Genthe, from a negative taken between 1906–1916. (Arnold Genthe Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs division)

Major works:
The Call of the WildThe Sea–WolfWhite Fang • “To Build a Fire”

“For example, the late Jack London. Where did he get his hot artistic passion, his delicate feeling for form and color, his extraordinary skill with words? The man, in truth, was an instinctive artist of a high order, and if ignorance often corrupted his art, it only made the fact of his inborn mastery the more remarkable.”
—H. L. Mencken

Read an excerpt from

The Road

Jack London

The very poor constitute the last sure recourse of the hungry tramp. The very poor can always be depended upon. They never turn away the hungry. Time and again, all over the United States, have I been refused food by the big house on the hill; and always have I received food from the little shack down by the creek or marsh, with its broken windows stuffed with rags and its tired-faced mother broken with labor.

Read a passage from The Road by Jack London
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